Ocean Park #60

Richard Diebenkorn, 1973, oil on canvas, 93 x 81 1/4 in.
Ocean Park #60, 1973

…enty years. The Ocean Park series represents a moment when Diebenkorn shifted back to abstraction after a number of years of working on representational forms. Although Ocean Park #60 doesn’t portray the ocean in a recognizable way, the layered blue and green hues evoke both the light of the ocean and a sense of depth. In contrast to this impression of limitlessness, the sharp spatial divisions along the perimeter of the canvas convey order and c…

Barrier

Vija Celmins, 1985-1986, oil and wax on linen, 70 x 72 in.
Barrier, 1985-1986

  Up Close: One Painting Tours With Artists Barrier Hosted by art historian and the associate director of ITALIC at Stanford, Kim Beil, the micro-video series focuses on a single object in the Anderson Collection, sparking dialogue with a guest artist. Kim spoke with artist Davina Semo about Vija Celmins’ Barrier. Explore the Up Close Series   “The images are not from observations of nature, but are ’found images’ fr…

Japanese Dancer Series No. 12 [Makiko]

Manuel Neri, 1980, Charcoal, dry pigment/water on paper., 41 3/4 x 29 3/4 in.
Japanese Dancer Series No. 12 [Makiko], 1980

Makiko In the late 1970s Neri began making regular trips to Carrara, Italy. He established a studio there in 1981 in order to readily access marble from the city’s famed quarries. Neri’s practice was profoundly affected by his proximity to the sculptural traditions of Western civilization, from the art of ancient Etruscans and classical antiquity to the haunting figures of Italian modernists Alberto Giacometti and Marino Marini. In Carrara Neri…

Japanese Dancer Series No. 2 [Makiko]

Manuel Neri, 1980, Charcoal, dry pigment/water on paper., 41 3/4 x 29 3/4 in.
Japanese Dancer Series No. 2 [Makiko], 1980

Makiko In the late 1970s Neri began making regular trips to Carrara, Italy. He established a studio there in 1981 in order to readily access marble from the city’s famed quarries. Neri’s practice was profoundly affected by his proximity to the sculptural traditions of Western civilization, from the art of ancient Etruscans and classical antiquity to the haunting figures of Italian modernists Alberto Giacometti and Marino Marini. In Carrara Neri…

Makida III

Manuel Neri, 1997, Marble and oil-based enamel., 24 x 16 x 22 in.
Makida III, 1997

…of temple statuary found in the Eastern tradition. The polished stone is partially masked with gestural strokes of bright pink-and-green paint used to set off her traditional Japanese hairstyle. When the figure is viewed from behind, the undulating shapes and energetic brushstrokes of her hair seem to morph into abstraction. In the late 1970s Neri began making regular trips to Carrara, Italy. He established a studio there in 1981 in order to rea…

Wall Painting No. IV

Robert Motherwell, 1954, oil on canvas, 54 x 72 in.
Wall Painting No. IV, 1954

…essionism movement with contemporaries like Jackson Pollock and Mark Rothko. Wall Painting IV shows Motherwell’s investment in shape and emotion. The crescent of black paint—a recurring shape in Motherwell’s oeuvre—tears through the center of the canvas. The swaths of black become the players in Motherwell’s drama, disturbing the regular order of the alternating brown and white stripes. Motherwell, who received a BA in philosophy from Stanford i…

The Anderson Collection at Stanford: An Uplifting Experience

09/24/14|Huffington Post

…g’s dedication on September 18, Stanford’s President John Hennessy praised the Anderson’s gift of 121 works by 86 artists as a “gift for the generations” and also noted with great pride that the Anderson would play a key role in the remarkable and ongoing “Stanford Arts Initiative.” If you think Stanford is just a tech-incubator with a football stadium, think again: the opening of the Anderson makes the S…

How the Stanford Arts District grew from a midair inspiration

05/13/14|SFGate, Sam Whiting (reprinted with permission from the San Francisco Chronicle)

…on on the open market, according to one estimate. University funds and private donations covered the $30 million cost of the two-story building to house it. The same funding mechanism is covering the majority of the cost for the McMurtry Building. These new buildings will flank the Cantor Arts Center and form a triangle off in a corner of campus where sleek modernist architecture and shiny siding won’t clash with the Romanesque sandstone of…

Anderson Collection at Stanford marks fifth anniversary

09/19/19|Palo Alto Weekly

…everything from art films, lectures, poetry readings and book previews. Preparing Stanford students for careers in the arts has always been a priority of the Anderson Collection and, in the past, many art history doctoral students were interns at the Collection’s headquarters on Sand Hill Road. Now, current Stanford students from a variety of disciplines have the opportunity to enter a two -year training program in order to become guides a…

Stanford unveils the Anderson Collection: New museum dedicated to renowned works of American art

09/19/14|Palo Alto Online

…g jewel in the crown of the burgeoning campus arts district.  From private to public The museum houses 121 works of art by 86 artists, a gift to the university from the Andersons (affectionately known as Hunk and Moo) and their daughter, Mary Patricia Anderson Pence. The history of their collecting is by now the stuff of legend: After a trip to Europe in the 1960s, Hunk and Moo decided to educate themselves about art in order to build a collectio…

The Catalogues

Left of Center: Five Years of the Anderson Collection at Stanford University Published by Anderson Collection at Stanford University This publication was produced in celebration of the museum’s fifth anniversary and the first fully student-curated exhibition of the same name. The catalogue showcases the intellectual curiosity and discovery of a group of PhD candidates and students in Stanford’s Department of Art and Art History who c…

Mary Margaret “Moo” Anderson, art collector and generous friend of Stanford University, dies at 92

10/24/19|Stanford News

…she listened and learned from curators and art historians, and spent a great deal of time examining the artwork in museums, galleries and artists’ studios in person. She opened her home so that students could have that same experience of looking and learning about art. We are so deeply grateful that Moo and Hunk trusted Stanford to be stewards of their remarkable collection and enable people of all ages to experience it on a daily basis.” ‘In or…

Hunk, Moo Anderson give modern art masterpieces to Stanford

09/09/14|SF Gate, Kenneth Baker (reprinted with permission from the San Francisco Chronicle)

…on in Geneva, and Hunk introduced me as Murma Ransford, which is what my parents called me. And a guy at the end of the bar said, ‘Moo Moo? What a funny name.’ So we shortened it to Moo.” During his senior year in college, Hunk and two close friends (who would become his lifelong business partners) sold Hobart College on the idea of providing its meals for students not living in fraternity houses, a service that was costing the…

Harry W. “Hunk” Anderson dies at 95

02/08/18|Anderson Collection at Stanford University

…te it in perpetuity, so that it could be used, shared and seen, reflected his philosophy that art can and should inspire all of us. All of us at Stanford will always have the deepest affection for Hunk as a generous, big-hearted man.” To date, the Anderson Collection at Stanford University has been seen by nearly 250,000 visitors. Every work in the museum is viewable online and the collection has grown through gifts from other members of the comm…

Hot Art Bling the New Thing on the Peninsula

04/27/16|KQED Arts

…’s one of the artists who’s benefited from Palo Alto’s city-sponsored, affordable studio space. (Photo: Courtesy of Michal Gavish) “Artists and arts groups can be considered here an endangered species,” says Rhyena Halpern, who oversees the city’s public investment in the arts as assistant director of Palo Alto’s Community Services Department. “Because the cost of living is so high, and the cost of doing business is so high.” But the very same e…

On Elite Campuses, an Arts Race

11/13/14|The New York Times

…h institution in Houston, classical singing students will benefit from an anonymous gift that spurred the design of a new opera theater by Diller, Scofidio & Renfro. “They realized that opera — uniting music, theater, scenic design, lighting — is the most truly interdisciplinary art form,” said Charles Renfro, a principal. Some of these projects have gone through years of struggle that pushed costs to startling heights. Recently, Princeton Un…

Stanford’s Anderson Collection museum to feature trove of couple’s art

07/11/14|Los Angeles Times

…“We worked with Richard for 21/2 years on this building,” says Moo, 86. Will she miss having the art in her home? “I think in order to enjoy art, you have to share it,” she says. Olcott was inspired by the accessibility and openness of the Andersons’ ranch house to create flexible galleries that can be dedicated to the Abstract Expressionists, Color Field painting, the art of Southern California including Robert Irwi…

Up Close: One Painting Tours With Artists

06/05/20|A project of the Anderson Collection at Stanford University

A project of the Anderson Collection at Stanford University Hosted by art historian and the associate director of ITALIC at Stanford, Kim Beil, the micro-video series “Up Close: One Painting Tours with Artists” focuses on a single object in the Anderson Collection, sparking dialogue with a guest artist. This project is made possible by a grant from Stanford Arts and the Anderson Collection at Stanford University. Artist Rebekah Goldstein explor…

The Magic of The Anderson Collection

10/08/14|Huffington Post

Pollock’s Lucifer now resides at Stanford University and is welcoming visitors. The news is of significance to everyone for reasons described in this article. Lucifer, the crown jewel of the Anderson Collection, moved to Stanford with a retinue of 120 colorful accomplices he’s befriended while living at the Andersons’ residence. The whole gang is now happily installed in a custom-designed museum on the Stanford campus. With ro…