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October 22, 2020 at 4:00pm

The introduction to the event experienced some technical difficulties. To skip to the beginning of the conversation between Eamon Ore-Giron and Edgar Garcia, begin the video at 8:40 (8 minutes, 40 seconds).

Stanford Presidential Visiting Artist Eamon Ore-Giron and poet and scholar Edgar Garcia will discuss the artist’s practice through a lens of abstraction and in relation to the history and symbolism of gold. The color gold features prominently in Ore-Giron’s ongoing series of Infinite Regress paintings, and the speakers will consider how we might decolonize and reevaluate this precious metal.

 

Additional programs with Eamon Ore-Giron will take place on October 29 and November 12.

 

Artist Eamon Ore-Giron has been awarded the 2020-2021 Presidential Residency for the Future of the Arts at the Anderson Collection and the Institute for Diversity in the Arts. Ore-Giron’s work draws on motifs from indigenous and craft traditions, such as Amazonian tapestries and pre-Colombian gold work, alongside aesthetics from 20th-century avant-gardes, including Suprematism, Neo-Concretism, and Futurism. Moving between temporalities and across cultural contexts, his large-scale abstract geometric paintings make manifest a history of transnational exchange. An exhibition of Ore-Giron’s work will be presented at the Anderson Collection in spring 2021.

Edgar Garcia is a Neubauer Family Assistant Professor at the University of Chicago in the Department of English Language and Literature. His research interests include the fields of indigenous, Latinx, and Chicanx studies; American literature, poetry, and poetics; environmental criticism; theory of law; and the intersection of poetry and anthropology.

Image: Eamon Ore-Giron. Infinite Regress CXVIII, 2020, Flashe on linen, 102 x 84 in. Photo: Joshua White.