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Stanford University's free museum of modern and contemporary American art

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11 a.m. – 5 p.m.

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Hot Art Bling the New Thing on the Peninsula

…ree months. “That teamlab animation is something to marvel at,” Kimball says. “It’s immersive. It’s so animated. There’s so much to look at.” Kimball insists she’s not really feeling competitive with Pace, though she wishes her organization had resources more in line with the shiny new neighbor up the road. “Pace certainly has a kick ass team,” Kimball says. “They also have a kick ass budget. There aren’t a lot of us who can mount a Turrell show…

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Apsáalooke artist Wendy Red Star creatively engages with the Stanford community

…ge with students and the community,” Linetzky said. Lady Columbia John Gast’s 1872 painting American Progress is the namesake and cornerstone for the new works at the Anderson Collection, beginning with a cheeky larger-than-life fabric female figure floating above the museum lobby. In Gast’s painting, an illuminated angel-like figure in diaphanous white known as “Lady Columbia” hovers over an American landscape that includes Native Americans bein…

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A Private Passion Goes Public: Stanford’s Anderson Collection

…smanship, what Harry calls “art based on head and hand.” From Joan Mitchell’s loaded brushwork inBefore, Again IV (1985) to Wayne Thiebaud’s painting Candy Counter (1962), in which lush pigment seems to frost the images of cakes, a tactile application of paint energizes both abstract and figurative canvases. In sculptures too, like Peter Voulkos’s Untitled Stack (1981) and Martin Puryear’s Dumb Luck (1990), con…

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Stanford unveils the Anderson Collection: New museum dedicated to renowned works of American art

…us all. That is a gift that keeps on giving. Freelance writer Sheryl Nonnenberg served as a curatorial associate at the Anderson Collection from 1994-1999. She can be emailed at nonnenberg@aol.com. What: Anderson Collection opening Where: The Anderson Collection, 314 Lomita Drive, Stanford When: 10 a.m. to 7 p.m. Cost: Free, but timed tickets are required for admission Info: Go to anderson.stanford.edu, call 650-721-6055, or email andersoncollect…

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Anderson Collection a modern art trove not to be missed

…see. It previously hung over Putter’s bed, before moving to the dining room and before coming here.” “There’s an incredible Mark Rothko (‘Pink and White Over Red’) that’s just beautiful — a seductive red painting.” “Robert Irwin’s untitled disk is capturing people’s attention. There’s this shadow quality — he was very interested in the transience of time and light. Hopefully you get lost in it a little bit.” “Agnes Martin’s (Untitled #21) is anot…

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A new lust for art takes hold in Silicon Valley

…will come to them.” And there is certainly evidence of an increasing appetite for contemporary and modern art in the suburbs. Art Silicon Valley/San Francisco, which highlights postwar and modern works, is returning to San Mateo in October for its fifth annual edition; over the course of its three days, the event has drawn more than 10,000 visitors. Spencer Finch’s light sculpture Betelgeuse is suspended over Rodin’s iconic The Thinker at the C…

Review: Anderson Collection of 20th-century art opens Sept. 21

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‘Formed & Fired: Contemporary American Ceramics’ at the Anderson Collection breaks the mold

…with me right now in a very contemporary way. He looks at what’s discarded and hand crafts it, with great care, into a beautiful object that’s given a different life,” said Aimee Shapiro, director of programming and engagement at the Anderson Collection. “He’s a young artist whose work addresses issues of police brutality and racism – issues that have existed for a long time and came to the forefront this year. I can’t help but want to be in the…

Construction on Anderson Collection art museum begins

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Instead of Changing Leaves, Peep Eight Bay Area Art Shows this Fall

…Sept. 9, 2015 – March 21, 2016 Stanford has not one but four — count ’em — four exhibitions opening on Sept. 9. At the Cantor Arts Center, Richard Diebenkorn: The Sketchbooks Revealed presents 29 of the artist’s sketchbooks (along with digital versions on touchscreen kiosks) alongside Edward Hopper: New York Corner, a recently-acquired work by an artist who influenced the young Diebenkorn when he studied at Stanford as an undergrad. And compleme…

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Palette Cleanser: A new campus museum quietly serves up a visual banquet

…ms into works of art themselves. But what if the client’s directive is just the opposite? A new campus museum in the Bay Area by the New York–based firm Ennead Architects may disappoint those hoping for a bigger architectural statement. However, as designed to house the 121 works of the Anderson Collection, a choice selection of postwar American art recently given to Stanford University, the 33,500-square-foot building does a good job at hiding i…

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Anderson Collection at Stanford marks fifth anniversary

…n front of his colorful “Four Women,” owned by the Collection. The Collection also collaborates with the Cantor Arts Center in presenting the annual McMurtry Lecture, which brings nationally recognized artists like Nick Cave, Robert Irwin and Judy Chicago to speak at the Bing Center. The Collection has made concerted efforts to reach out to the community, beyond the campus. The Second Sunday Program is geared toward young families and…

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Harry ‘Hunk’ Anderson, modern art collector and philanthropist, dies at 95

…irector of the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art. “The museum collection would simply not be what it is without their profound generosity.” At one point, there was talk that the vast Anderson holdings would go to either SFMOMA or the Fine Arts Museums. The Andersons settled on Stanford, which agreed to build a $36 million two-story building run independently of the university museum, Cantor Arts Center, next door. When the Anderson Collection op…

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Full House

…ch is still decorated with equestrian ribbons and an autograph book from the ’70s (the first page of which bears the signature “Clyfford Still”), has a good-size canvas by Hans Hoffmann. Indeed, when the Andersons bought their prized Pollock in 1970, they hung it over Putter’s bed, because, as Moo says, “we had an empty space on the wall.” When the art dealer André Emmerich came to visit, he took one look at the painting and said to Hunk: “Maybe…

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Stanford University to receive Anderson Collection of 20th-century American art

…ich is being donated to the university by Harry W. and Mary Margaret Anderson, and Mary Patricia Anderson Pence, the Bay Area family who built the collection over nearly 50 years. Harry W. Anderson, left, Mary Patricia Anderson Pence and Mary Margaret Anderson stand between two paintings, a Franz Kline and a Mark Rothko, which are part of the gift to Stanford. The Anderson Collection at Stanford will contain 121 works by 86 artists, including so…

Previewing the Anderson Collection at Stanford University

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Up Close: One Painting Tours With Artists

…She opened her first solo museum exhibition at the di Rosa Museum (Napa) in February 2020. Semo lives and works in San Francisco. Discover more of her work http://davinasemo.net. You can also follow her on Instagram. Artist Erica Deeman explores Jennifer Bartlett’s At The Lake, Morning Erica Deeman is a visual artist living and working in San Francisco, CA. Originally from the U.K., she has lived in the States for just over 8 years. Dee…

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The Magic of The Anderson Collection

…e of humility and deference to the art it encloses. Once inside though, one is in for a treat. And a treat it is indeed! Slow stairs take visitors to the first floor where the art resides. There is no art on the stair walls. “It gives visitors a chance to cleanse their mind”, explains Olcott. As we walk up the stairs, an oversized and inviting Clyfford Still pulls our eyes up, giving the ascent an aura of mystery. Once at the top of t…

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Manuel Neri’s Chromatic Chaos

…he preferred working with it.. “It’s a blah material,” he philosophized, “a dumb material. It doesn’t dictate to you at all. You can do anything you want to with it, practically, from a polished, glass-like finish to a rough, broken surface.” At $3 per bag, which Neri could only sometimes afford, plaster was also a forgiving material that allowed mistakes and improvisation: a poor man’s marble that could be hacked into submission. There is a cert…