Ocean Park #60

Richard Diebenkorn, 1973, oil on canvas, 93 x 81 1/4 in.
Ocean Park #60, 1973

  Though he resisted being categorized as a “California artist,” Richard Diebenkorn spent the majority of his career on the West Coast. In the fall of 1966, Diebenkorn moved from Berkeley to Santa Monica, where he found an art studio in Ocean Park, a gritty neighborhood along the oceanfront that was a hub of artistic activity. It was here that Diebenkorn painted the 145 paintings in his Ocean Park series, which he developed over the course…

Timeless Clock

David Smith, 1957, silver, 20 3/8 x 26 x 6 1/2 in.
Timeless Clock, 1957

Trained as a welder and painter in New York, Smith created metal assemblages that challenged the traditional notion of sculpture as something carved or modeled. Timeless Clock exemplifies Smith’s skill and attention to detail. Working at an intimate scale with a precious metal, Smith imbued this frozen timepiece with the complexity and precision of fine jewelry, yet its elaborate open fretwork retains the spontaneity of drawing in air. Timeless…

Japanese Dancer Series No. 2 [Makiko]

Manuel Neri, 1980, Charcoal, dry pigment/water on paper., 41 3/4 x 29 3/4 in.
Japanese Dancer Series No. 2 [Makiko], 1980

Makiko In the late 1970s Neri began making regular trips to Carrara, Italy. He established a studio there in 1981 in order to readily access marble from the city’s famed quarries. Neri’s practice was profoundly affected by his proximity to the sculptural traditions of Western civilization, from the art of ancient Etruscans and classical antiquity to the haunting figures of Italian modernists Alberto Giacometti and Marino Marini. In Carrara Neri…

Wall Painting No. IV

Robert Motherwell, 1954, oil on canvas, 54 x 72 in.
Wall Painting No. IV, 1954

Robert Motherwell graduated from Stanford in 1937, having studied psychology, philosophy, and literature. Motherwell started a graduate degree in art history at Columbia University under the guidance of renowned art historian Meyer Schapiro. In New York, Motherwell strayed from history and became a practicing artist. He would go on to found the abstract expressionism movement with contemporaries like Jackson Pollock and Mark Rothko. Wall Paintin…

Japanese Dancer Series No. 12 [Makiko]

Manuel Neri, 1980, Charcoal, dry pigment/water on paper., 41 3/4 x 29 3/4 in.
Japanese Dancer Series No. 12 [Makiko], 1980

Makiko In the late 1970s Neri began making regular trips to Carrara, Italy. He established a studio there in 1981 in order to readily access marble from the city’s famed quarries. Neri’s practice was profoundly affected by his proximity to the sculptural traditions of Western civilization, from the art of ancient Etruscans and classical antiquity to the haunting figures of Italian modernists Alberto Giacometti and Marino Marini. In Carrara Neri…

Makida III

Manuel Neri, 1997, Marble and oil-based enamel., 24 x 16 x 22 in.
Makida III, 1997

Makida III, a carving of [Makiko] Nakamura’s head in veined Carrara marble, suggests a synthesis of Eastern and Western artistic traditions. Its larger-than-life scale and placid expression evoke the contemplative mood of temple statuary found in the Eastern tradition. The polished stone is partially masked with gestural strokes of bright pink-and-green paint used to set off her traditional Japanese hairstyle. When the figure is viewed from behi…

Review: Anderson Collection of 20th-century art opens Sept. 21

09/18/14|Contra Costa Times

Fifty years ago, Harry and Mary Margaret Anderson visited Paris and discovered a shared passion for the art of the French Impressionists. He was one of the founders of Saga food services, and when they returned to the Bay Area they could afford to begin collecting art by Renoir and Monet.   But they couldn’t buy paintings the way museums could. So they put aside the 19th century Frenchmen and turned to the painters Harry Anderson no…

The Catalogues

Left of Center: Five Years of the Anderson Collection at Stanford University Published by Anderson Collection at Stanford University This publication was produced in celebration of the museum’s fifth anniversary and the first fully student-curated exhibition of the same name. The catalogue showcases the intellectual curiosity and discovery of a group of PhD candidates and students in Stanford’s Department of Art and Art History who c…

Mary Margaret “Moo” Anderson, art collector and generous friend of Stanford University, dies at 92

10/24/19|Stanford News

Local resident Moo Anderson and her family gifted Stanford a celebrated collection of postwar and contemporary American art and her prized collection of art books and catalogs. BY BETH GIUDICESSI AND ROBIN WANDER Stanford donor Mary Margaret “Moo” Anderson died Oct. 22 at her Bay Area Peninsula home surrounded by her family. She was 92. In 2011, Moo, her late husband, Harry “Hunk” Anderson, and their daughter, Mary Patricia “Putter” Ande…

Stanford Builds Arts District With $36 Million Postwar Museum

09/19/14|Bloomberg Business Week

Jackson Pollock, Mark Rothko and Frank Stella are some of the stars of the Anderson Collection of postwar American art, opening this weekend at a new $36 million museum at Stanford University in California. For Stanford, which first made its reputation as an engineering school, the building is the second of three projects to create an arts district around its flagship museum, the Cantor Center. The nearby $112 million Bing Concert Hall opened in…

Hunk, Moo Anderson give modern art masterpieces to Stanford

09/09/14|SF Gate, Kenneth Baker (reprinted with permission from the San Francisco Chronicle)

Harry W. and Mary Margaret Anderson didn’t know much about art – they’d dabbled in antiques – before they first visited Paris in 1964 and made their way into the Louvre. “We became so enamored with the visual experience that on the way home, we looked at each other and said, ‘How could all this have been going on and we not have been a part of it?’ ” said Harry “Hunk” Anderson. The muse…

Harry W. “Hunk” Anderson dies at 95

02/08/18|Anderson Collection at Stanford University

Art collector and Stanford donor Harry “Hunk” Anderson dies at 95 The longtime friend of the university welcomed Stanford graduate students to study the art in his home and office, and then he and his family made the collection accessible to the world through a transformative gift. BY ROBIN WANDER Stanford neighbor, friend and philanthropist Harry W. “Hunk” Anderson died on Feb. 7 at his Bay Area Peninsula home surrounded by his family….

Stanford’s Anderson Collection museum to feature trove of couple’s art

07/11/14|Los Angeles Times

Along a shady road here, you can glimpse large estates behind gates and hedges bought with fortunes earned in Silicon Valley. Then you come to the driveway of a ranch house that stands pretty much as it was when built in the 1960s by Harry and Mary Margaret Anderson. From the unpretentious exterior, few would guess that inside the house a single painting in their collection is worth as much as one or even two of those neighboring estates. This…

Up Close: One Painting Tours With Artists

06/05/20|A project of the Anderson Collection at Stanford University

A project of the Anderson Collection at Stanford University Hosted by art historian and the associate director of ITALIC at Stanford, Kim Beil, the micro-video series “Up Close: One Painting Tours with Artists” focuses on a single object in the Anderson Collection, sparking dialogue with a guest artist. This project is made possible by a grant from Stanford Arts and the Anderson Collection at Stanford University. Artist Rebekah Goldstein explor…

A Private Passion Goes Public: Stanford’s Anderson Collection

10/22/14|Art in America

by Carol Strickland The Anderson Collection at Stanford University, designed by Richard Olcott of Ennead Architects. Photo Tim Griffith.  ADVERTISEMENT Stanford University, a hub of innovative entrepreneurship in Silicon Valley and the origin of the “sharing economy” (think Uber and Airbnb), is now home to a magnificent example of art sharing. The Anderson Collection, a new museum that is part of Stanford’s pu…

Free Museums’ Membership for the Class of 2020!

06/02/20|Stanford Art Museums

The Cantor Arts Center and Anderson Collection at Stanford University miss seeing you. We are eager to welcome you back to campus, share art and connect over ideas. Now through August 31, 2020, we are offering all Stanford graduates in the class of 2020 one year of free Ambassador membership ($100 value*) to both museums. Each membership covers up to two adults and children within a single household. To get your FREE membership, fill out t…

Elite Collection of Modern Masters to Anchor Stanford’s Growing ‘Arts District’

11/06/13|KQED

I got a preview Tuesday of a coming arts district and curriculum at Stanford University and the truly drool-worthy collection of modern art that will help anchor it. Jason Linetzky, director of Stanford’s Anderson Collection, led a small group of journalists around the collection at an office complex just off Sand Hill Road. Harry Anderson and his wife Mary are donating 121 paintings and drawings plus a small art library to Stanford, including w…

How the Stanford Arts District grew from a midair inspiration

05/13/14|SFGate, Sam Whiting (reprinted with permission from the San Francisco Chronicle)

The Stanford Arts District fell out of a private jet crossing the country in 2007, on a return flight from a celebration of the program Stanford in Washington. The plane was chartered by Burt McMurtry, a member of the Stanford University Board of Trustees, and it carried two other passengers: McMurtry’s wife, Deedee, and Stanford President John Hennessy. Hennessy sat in back working at his laptop until the moment he moved forward to the se…

The Museum of Hunk, Moo & Putter: The Anderson Collection at Stanford will Rock You

12/28/18|Forbes Magazine

Tom Teicholz Contributor Arts I write about culture and the cult of luxury On a recent trip to San Francisco, I decided to make a short detour to the Anderson Collection at Stanford University (easily reachable by public transport from San Francisco or from the airport) – it is very much worth the trip. The Anderson Collection is very much focused on American Art of the 20thCentury in general, with a specific concentration on West Coast…

‘Formed & Fired: Contemporary American Ceramics’ at the Anderson Collection breaks the mold

12/11/20|Stanford News

From ancient pottery and medicinal clay to 3D-printed joints and pajamas that restore athletes’ muscles, the use of ceramics for objects rooted in decoration, ritual and utility is as old as it is expansive. The practices of four living artists whose exploration of the medium provides commentary on its past and insight for the future are presented in Formed & Fired: Contemporary American Ceramics at the Anderson Collection at Stanford Unive…