Ocean Park #60

Richard Diebenkorn, 1973, oil on canvas, 93 x 81 1/4 in.
Ocean Park #60, 1973

…you could … see what he was processing and essentializing … You have to have that sense of ambiguity … in order to … drive the painting into something other than something obvious and too predictable.” (Courtesy The Diebenkorn Foundation and Acquavella Galleries.)   Up Close: One Painting Tours With Artists Ocean Park #60 Hosted by art historian and the associate director of ITALIC at Stanford, Kim Beil, the micro-video serie…

Timeless Clock

David Smith, 1957, silver, 20 3/8 x 26 x 6 1/2 in.
Timeless Clock, 1957

Trained as a welder and painter in New York, Smith created metal assemblages that challenged the traditional notion of sculpture as something carved or modeled. Timeless Clock exemplifies Smith’s skill and attention to detail. Working at an intimate scale with a precious metal, Smith imbued this frozen timepiece with the complexity and precision of fine jewelry, yet its elaborate open fretwork retains the spontaneity of drawing in air. Timeless…

Japanese Dancer Series No. 2 [Makiko]

Manuel Neri, 1980, Charcoal, dry pigment/water on paper., 41 3/4 x 29 3/4 in.
Japanese Dancer Series No. 2 [Makiko], 1980

Makiko In the late 1970s Neri began making regular trips to Carrara, Italy. He established a studio there in 1981 in order to readily access marble from the city’s famed quarries. Neri’s practice was profoundly affected by his proximity to the sculptural traditions of Western civilization, from the art of ancient Etruscans and classical antiquity to the haunting figures of Italian modernists Alberto Giacometti and Marino Marini. In Carrara Neri…

Japanese Dancer Series No. 12 [Makiko]

Manuel Neri, 1980, Charcoal, dry pigment/water on paper., 41 3/4 x 29 3/4 in.
Japanese Dancer Series No. 12 [Makiko], 1980

Makiko In the late 1970s Neri began making regular trips to Carrara, Italy. He established a studio there in 1981 in order to readily access marble from the city’s famed quarries. Neri’s practice was profoundly affected by his proximity to the sculptural traditions of Western civilization, from the art of ancient Etruscans and classical antiquity to the haunting figures of Italian modernists Alberto Giacometti and Marino Marini. In Carrara Neri…

Makida III

Manuel Neri, 1997, Marble and oil-based enamel., 24 x 16 x 22 in.
Makida III, 1997

Makida III, a carving of [Makiko] Nakamura’s head in veined Carrara marble, suggests a synthesis of Eastern and Western artistic traditions. Its larger-than-life scale and placid expression evoke the contemplative mood of temple statuary found in the Eastern tradition. The polished stone is partially masked with gestural strokes of bright pink-and-green paint used to set off her traditional Japanese hairstyle. When the figure is viewed from behi…

Wall Painting No. IV

Robert Motherwell, 1954, oil on canvas, 54 x 72 in.
Wall Painting No. IV, 1954

…strayed from history and became a practicing artist. He would go on to found the abstract expressionism movement with contemporaries like Jackson Pollock and Mark Rothko. Wall Painting IV shows Motherwell’s investment in shape and emotion. The crescent of black paint—a recurring shape in Motherwell’s oeuvre—tears through the center of the canvas. The swaths of black become the players in Motherwell’s drama, disturbing the regular order of the alt…

Review: Anderson Collection of 20th-century art opens Sept. 21

09/18/14|Contra Costa Times

…sculpture are grouped to some extent by style and period, covering 56 years. But as Olcott points out, there is no “prescriptive path.”  Still, curator Jason Linetzky and his crew have made canny arrangements to connect and contrast a variety of works. In the introductory gallery at the top of a staircase hangs Clyfford Still’s 9-by-12-foot “1957-J No. 1,” with its stripped black, brown and white colorwork. It sugge…

The Catalogues

…a Provostial Professor in the Arts and Humanities, Stanford’s Department of Art & Art History, and essays by noted scholar Bruce Nixon which all illustrate Neri’s lifelong involvement with the most creative traditions to capture the modern age—in all its contradictions, vulnerabilities, and possibilities—in the enduring mirror of the human body. Available for purchase at the museum: $40 non-members, $32 members. To order online click here. &n…

Mary Margaret “Moo” Anderson, art collector and generous friend of Stanford University, dies at 92

10/24/19|Stanford News

…21 pieces found a new home at Stanford. After Hunk Anderson’s death in 2018, Moo and Putter continued to collect with a focus on emerging artists. Moo remained involved with the Anderson Collection at Stanford University until her death. She saw the collection grow through gifts from other members of the community, and generously loaned artwork from her private collection to the museum in order to engage visitors in new ways. “The Andersons’ coll…

Stanford Builds Arts District With $36 Million Postwar Museum

09/19/14|Bloomberg Business Week

…arts,” Tiews said. Harry Anderson and his wife, Mary Margaret, longtime San Francisco Bay Area residents though not Stanford graduates, began collecting contemporary art in the 1960s. Their gift to the university includes 121 works by 86 artists, with emphasis on the New York School of abstract expressionism and California artists such as Wayne Thiebaud and Stanford graduate Richard Diebenkorn. The current installation features 104 of the works….

Hunk, Moo Anderson give modern art masterpieces to Stanford

09/09/14|SF Gate, Kenneth Baker (reprinted with permission from the San Francisco Chronicle)

…ed age effectively makes the market value of the Anderson Collection incalculable. But “for us, it’s not about how much, but how good,” Hunk said of the family’s acquisitions. “We always want the pick of the litter.” From the beginning, getting their pick has been a matter of relationships with dealers, fellow collectors and artists. Their scoring of Pollock’s “Lucifer,” not long after they de…

Harry W. “Hunk” Anderson dies at 95

02/08/18|Anderson Collection at Stanford University

…nead Architects in Stanford’s arts district opened to the public in 2014. The Anderson family has a long history with Stanford, dating back to their 1960s relationship with the Department of Art and Art History, including Nathan Oliveira, artist and professor; Albert Elsen, art historian and professor; and Wanda Corn, former chair of the department, all of whom were integral resources to the Andersons as they built their collection. In 1975 the A…

Stanford’s Anderson Collection museum to feature trove of couple’s art

07/11/14|Los Angeles Times

…Young.) However, what the Andersons call their “core collection” remained at the ranch house. Along with their association with SFMOMA, the couple have enjoyed a lengthy relationship with Stanford University, though neither is an alumnus. For decades, Stanford doctoral candidates in art history have worked as interns with the collection, including Neil Benezra, now director of SFMOMA. Benezra harbors no ill will that their collection…

Up Close: One Painting Tours With Artists

06/05/20|A project of the Anderson Collection at Stanford University

…and the associate director of ITALIC at Stanford, Kim Beil, the micro-video series “Up Close: One Painting Tours with Artists” focuses on a single object in the Anderson Collection, sparking dialogue with a guest artist. This project is made possible by a grant from Stanford Arts and the Anderson Collection at Stanford University. Artist Rebekah Goldstein explores Richard Diebenkorn’s Ocean Park #60 Rebekah Goldstein is a San Francisco-based p…

Free Museums’ Membership for the Class of 2020!

06/02/20|Stanford Art Museums

The Cantor Arts Center and Anderson Collection at Stanford University miss seeing you. We are eager to welcome you back to campus, share art and connect over ideas. Now through August 31, 2020, we are offering all Stanford graduates in the class of 2020 one year of free Ambassador membership ($100 value*) to both museums. Each membership covers up to two adults and children within a single household. To get your FREE membership, fill out t…

How the Stanford Arts District grew from a midair inspiration

05/13/14|SFGate, Sam Whiting (reprinted with permission from the San Francisco Chronicle)

…nt was made of the lead donors to the McMurtry Building for the Art and Art History. “It helped in dealing with the Andersons,” McMurtry says. “They got to see a lot of real action.” In 2011, Hunk and Moo Anderson, along with their daughter “Putter” Anderson Pence, gifted 121 works by 86 artists to Stanford, which none of the Andersons attended. The works range from the drip art of Jackson Pollock to the candy…

A Private Passion Goes Public: Stanford’s Anderson Collection

10/22/14|Art in America

…naively,” 92-year-old Harry Anderson told A.i.A., “thinking that art was somebody we would play golf with.” Bowled over by the aesthetic experience of great art but novices in connoisseurship, he added, “We had to go from minus 10 to plus 100.” Naiveté about the challenge of building a top-notch art collection played in their favor. “We didn’t know it couldn’t be done,” Harry admits, “so…

Elite Collection of Modern Masters to Anchor Stanford’s Growing ‘Arts District’

11/06/13|KQED

…ave collected since they got hooked on art after a 1964 visit to the Louvre in Paris. A better eye than mine has noted the Anderson collection is a careful balance between abstract and figurative works. The Andersons have had the money to buy the best. Harry Anderson and two friends founded Saga Foods (now owned by Marriott) in 1948 while students at New York state’s Hobart College, and Anderson, 93, said today the company was profitable from day…

Anderson Collection at Stanford solidifies Bay Area’s art stature

09/20/14|SF Gate, Kenneth Baker (reprinted with permission from the San Francisco Chronicle)

…aesthetic kinship. Stand behind David Smith‘s silver sculpture “Timeless Clock” (1957) – not that it really has a back side – and on a wall opposite, you see a startling family resemblance in Kline’s similarly choppy 1952 painted composition “Figure 8.” Neither the collectors nor the curators suggest that the later work was made – or acquired – with such a linkage in mind. But the creati…

Instead of Changing Leaves, Peep Eight Bay Area Art Shows this Fall

08/25/15|KQED Arts

…orary California Quilts Oakland Museum of California Sept. 12, 2015 – Feb. 21, 2016 OMCA starts the fall season with the work of five Bay Area female quilters, showing 20 quilts from the late 1980s to the early 2000s. Seeking orderly patterns and demure fabrics in your textiles? This show is not for you. Working with full denim pant legs, velvet and glittery polyester, Angie Tobias, Arbie Williams, Mattie Pickett, Rosie Lee Tompkins and Sherry B…