Killyboffin

Bruce Beasley, 1968, cast acrylic, 28 x 45 x 13 1/4 in.
Killyboffin, 1968

On the title, Killyboffin, Bruce Beasley remarks, “The truth is that it is a name that I saw on one of the Washington State ferryboats.  I thought it was a great name and would make a good name for a sculpture because it did not imply any context.”…

Barrier

Vija Celmins, 1985-1986, oil and wax on linen, 70 x 72 in.
Barrier, 1985-1986

  Up Close: One Painting Tours With Artists Barrier Hosted by art historian and the associate director of ITALIC at Stanford, Kim Beil, the micro-video series focuses on a single object in the Anderson Collection, sparking dialogue with a guest artist. Kim spoke with artist Davina Semo about Vija Celmins’ Barrier. Explore the Up Close Series   “The images are not from observations of nature, but are ’found images’ fr…

Lucifer

Jackson Pollock, 1947, oil and enamel on canvas, 41 3/16 X 105 1/2 in.
Lucifer, 1947

In a 1951 radio interview Pollock proclaimed: “It seems to me that the modern painter cannot express this age, the airplane, the atom bomb, the radio, in the old forms of the Renaissance or any other past culture. Each age finds its own technique.” Lucifer is among the earliest examples of Pollock’s own groundbreaking approach, which involved dripping, pouring, and splattering paint directly onto a canvas that had been tacked to the floor. The p…

The Catalogues

Left of Center: Five Years of the Anderson Collection at Stanford University Published by Anderson Collection at Stanford University This publication was produced in celebration of the museum’s fifth anniversary and the first fully student-curated exhibition of the same name. The catalogue showcases the intellectual curiosity and discovery of a group of PhD candidates and students in Stanford’s Department of Art and Art History who c…

Hunk, Moo Anderson give modern art masterpieces to Stanford

09/09/14|SF Gate, Kenneth Baker (reprinted with permission from the San Francisco Chronicle)

Harry W. and Mary Margaret Anderson didn’t know much about art – they’d dabbled in antiques – before they first visited Paris in 1964 and made their way into the Louvre. “We became so enamored with the visual experience that on the way home, we looked at each other and said, ‘How could all this have been going on and we not have been a part of it?’ ” said Harry “Hunk” Anderson. The muse…

Star Quality: A Portrait of the Anderson Collection

09/01/14|art ltd.

…Art 101 at Stanford was a starting place. Elsen became a close friend and mentor, commenting tactfully on early purchases, gently encouraging them to look deeper. Proudly showing him their recent purchase of a Jackson Pollock, Elsen admired it then added, “Have you seen the black Pollock at the NY MOMA?” Praising their purchase of de Kooning’s  Woman Standing—Pink , (1954-55), he tutored them in the nuances of  Gansevoort Street , an earlier sem…

REPORT: Stanford

01/24/14|art ltd.

With the Detroit Institute of Art foundering, and sister institutions barely afloat, the institution of the public art museum as community center appears endangered, eclipsed by commercial art fairs on the one hand and somewhat generic art museums, showing the art world’s usual big-name suspects, on the other. Smaller museums target specific audiences, sometimes to the detriment of aesthetic quality, which is seen by some as old-fashioned…

Up Close: One Painting Tours With Artists

06/05/20|A project of the Anderson Collection at Stanford University

A project of the Anderson Collection at Stanford University Hosted by art historian and the associate director of ITALIC at Stanford, Kim Beil, the micro-video series “Up Close: One Painting Tours with Artists” focuses on a single object in the Anderson Collection, sparking dialogue with a guest artist. This project is made possible by a grant from Stanford Arts and the Anderson Collection at Stanford University. Artist Rebekah Goldstein explor…

Mary Margaret ‘Moo’ Anderson, modern art collector and benefactor, dead at 92

10/25/19|The San Francisco Chronicle

…future husband at the Seneca Yacht Club in the summer of 1948. On one of their first dates, Anderson garbled the name “Murma” when introducing her to a friend named Moose. He heard her name as “Moo Moo” not “Murma” and it was Moo from that point on, according to her granddaughter Devin Pence. Hunk and Moo were married in 1950. By then Anderson and two partners had started a venture to improve dormitory food service and it soon expanded across the…

Our Reopening Guidelines

…ll galleries will be open for viewing with the exception of the Pigott Gallery. Will catalogues be available for purchase? Catalogues are available for purchase in the lobbies of the museums. Purchases can be made by credit or debit card only. We are not accepting cash at this time. Are wheelchairs available for visitor use? Wheelchairs are available. Please indicate the need for a wheelchair when you reserve your ticket so that we can best acc…

Harry W. “Hunk” Anderson dies at 95

02/08/18|Anderson Collection at Stanford University

Art collector and Stanford donor Harry “Hunk” Anderson dies at 95 The longtime friend of the university welcomed Stanford graduate students to study the art in his home and office, and then he and his family made the collection accessible to the world through a transformative gift. BY ROBIN WANDER Stanford neighbor, friend and philanthropist Harry W. “Hunk” Anderson died on Feb. 7 at his Bay Area Peninsula home surrounded by his family….

Make a Gift

…y of the Anderson Collection in perpetuity. Gifts of $400,000 to $5 million will allow donors the opportunity to name selected programs, leadership positions, or spaces in the museum, in addition to their name listed in the lobby’s signage. Make a Gift Contacts For more information and gift inquiries: Maude Brezinski Senior Director of Development for the Arts at Stanford University 650-723-0044   For media inquiries: Beth…

Stanford unveils the Anderson Collection: New museum dedicated to renowned works of American art

09/19/14|Palo Alto Online

by Sheryl Nonnenberg / Palo Alto Weekly “How did they fit all this art in their house?” That was the question of the day at the media preview for Stanford’s new Anderson Collection, which opens to the public with a grand celebration this Sunday, September 21. Being surrounded by museum-quality works by artists including Mark Rothko, Jackson Pollock and Richard Diebenkorn was a way of life for collectors Harry W. and Mary Marga…

The Magic of The Anderson Collection

10/08/14|Huffington Post

Pollock’s Lucifer now resides at Stanford University and is welcoming visitors. The news is of significance to everyone for reasons described in this article. Lucifer, the crown jewel of the Anderson Collection, moved to Stanford with a retinue of 120 colorful accomplices he’s befriended while living at the Andersons’ residence. The whole gang is now happily installed in a custom-designed museum on the Stanford campus. With ro…

Anderson Collection pieces lock in a home at Stanford

09/13/14|SF Gate, Sam Whiting (reprinted with permission from the San Francisco Chronicle)

…son deferred to him by making a different selection, leaving “Zeltweg” to Anderson. It was probably a six-figure purchase, even 33 years ago. “I think this was Philip’s first choice,” Anderson says of “Zeltweg.” Named for a Formula One racetrack in Austria, the painting is on honeycombed aluminum. “A map of the experience of the track” is how Stella described it. Records show that the work was publicly displayed during the opening of the new wing…

The Anderson Collection at Stanford: An Uplifting Experience

09/24/14|Huffington Post

The Anderson Collection at Stanford: An Uplifting Experience Posted: 09/24/2014 2:51 pm EDT  Updated: 2 hours ago Visiting the newly-opened Anderson Collection at Stanford requires taking everything — your body and your expectations — up a level. After entering the building’s main lobby — which will cost you nothing as the Anderson is free — you will ascend a grand staircase that plateaus at the building&#8217…

Anderson Collection opens to public on Sept. 21

09/19/14|The Stanford Daily

The Anderson Collection opens to the public at its new Stanford University home this Sunday, Sept. 21, in a freestanding pavilion next to the Cantor Arts Center in the University’s growing arts district. Members of the Cantor Arts Center and the Anderson Collection can also attend a special preview of the museum on Sept. 20. Opening day festivities will include food trucks, music, activities and digital tours. Admission is free, and while visito…

Anderson Collection at Stanford solidifies Bay Area’s art stature

09/20/14|SF Gate, Kenneth Baker (reprinted with permission from the San Francisco Chronicle)

When the Anderson Collection at Stanford University opens to the public this Sunday, visitors will be rewarded with a breathtaking introduction to one of the world’s most important private collections. The long-anticipated institution, adjacent to the Cantor Arts Center, features a formidable cache of modern and contemporary art and certifies the Bay Area’s growing international stature as a destination for lovers and scholars of 20t…

A new start for art at Stanford: Cantor Arts Center and Anderson Collection reopen

04/22/21|Palo Alto Online

A new start for art at Stanford: Cantor Arts Center and Anderson Collection reopen Sheryl Nonnenberg 7-8 minutes After more than a year of closure, Stanford University’s major art museums — Cantor Arts Center and the Anderson Collection at Stanford — are open again. A visit to campus reveals that, while some things have remained the same (the venerable Rodin sculpture collection, for example), there have been some significant c…