Ocean Park #60

Richard Diebenkorn, 1973, oil on canvas, 93 x 81 1/4 in.
Ocean Park #60, 1973

  Though he resisted being categorized as a “California artist,” Richard Diebenkorn spent the majority of his career on the West Coast. In the fall of 1966, Diebenkorn moved from Berkeley to Santa Monica, where he found an art studio in Ocean Park, a gritty neighborhood along the oceanfront that was a hub of artistic activity. It was here that Diebenkorn painted the 145 paintings in his Ocean Park series, which he developed over the course…

Barrier

Vija Celmins, 1985-1986, oil and wax on linen, 70 x 72 in.
Barrier, 1985-1986

  Up Close: One Painting Tours With Artists Barrier Hosted by art historian and the associate director of ITALIC at Stanford, Kim Beil, the micro-video series focuses on a single object in the Anderson Collection, sparking dialogue with a guest artist. Kim spoke with artist Davina Semo about Vija Celmins’ Barrier. Explore the Up Close Series   “The images are not from observations of nature, but are ’found images’ fr…

Japanese Dancer Series No. 2 [Makiko]

Manuel Neri, 1980, Charcoal, dry pigment/water on paper., 41 3/4 x 29 3/4 in.
Japanese Dancer Series No. 2 [Makiko], 1980

Makiko In the late 1970s Neri began making regular trips to Carrara, Italy. He established a studio there in 1981 in order to readily access marble from the city’s famed quarries. Neri’s practice was profoundly affected by his proximity to the sculptural traditions of Western civilization, from the art of ancient Etruscans and classical antiquity to the haunting figures of Italian modernists Alberto Giacometti and Marino Marini. In Carrara Neri…

Japanese Dancer Series No. 12 [Makiko]

Manuel Neri, 1980, Charcoal, dry pigment/water on paper., 41 3/4 x 29 3/4 in.
Japanese Dancer Series No. 12 [Makiko], 1980

Makiko In the late 1970s Neri began making regular trips to Carrara, Italy. He established a studio there in 1981 in order to readily access marble from the city’s famed quarries. Neri’s practice was profoundly affected by his proximity to the sculptural traditions of Western civilization, from the art of ancient Etruscans and classical antiquity to the haunting figures of Italian modernists Alberto Giacometti and Marino Marini. In Carrara Neri…

Makida III

Manuel Neri, 1997, Marble and oil-based enamel., 24 x 16 x 22 in.
Makida III, 1997

Makida III, a carving of [Makiko] Nakamura’s head in veined Carrara marble, suggests a synthesis of Eastern and Western artistic traditions. Its larger-than-life scale and placid expression evoke the contemplative mood of temple statuary found in the Eastern tradition. The polished stone is partially masked with gestural strokes of bright pink-and-green paint used to set off her traditional Japanese hairstyle. When the figure is viewed from behi…

Wall Painting No. IV

Robert Motherwell, 1954, oil on canvas, 54 x 72 in.
Wall Painting No. IV, 1954

Robert Motherwell graduated from Stanford in 1937, having studied psychology, philosophy, and literature. Motherwell started a graduate degree in art history at Columbia University under the guidance of renowned art historian Meyer Schapiro. In New York, Motherwell strayed from history and became a practicing artist. He would go on to found the abstract expressionism movement with contemporaries like Jackson Pollock and Mark Rothko. Wall Paintin…

The Catalogues

Left of Center: Five Years of the Anderson Collection at Stanford University Published by Anderson Collection at Stanford University This publication was produced in celebration of the museum’s fifth anniversary and the first fully student-curated exhibition of the same name. The catalogue showcases the intellectual curiosity and discovery of a group of PhD candidates and students in Stanford’s Department of Art and Art History who c…

Star Quality: A Portrait of the Anderson Collection

09/01/14|art ltd.

…Art 101 at Stanford was a starting place. Elsen became a close friend and mentor, commenting tactfully on early purchases, gently encouraging them to look deeper. Proudly showing him their recent purchase of a Jackson Pollock, Elsen admired it then added, “Have you seen the black Pollock at the NY MOMA?” Praising their purchase of de Kooning’s  Woman Standing—Pink , (1954-55), he tutored them in the nuances of  Gansevoort Street , an earlier sem…

Our Reopening Guidelines

…itioned to a web/app contactless system. Review the parking section below for details. Health Acknowledegment In order to help us maintain a safe environment for visitors and staff, we ask that those who are under isolation or quarantine orders do not enter the museums. Further, by entering the museums, you acknowledge that you and all persons in your party are not experiencing any of the symptoms of COVID-19 identified by the Centers for Disease…

Stanford unveils the Anderson Collection: New museum dedicated to renowned works of American art

09/19/14|Palo Alto Online

…he stuff of legend: After a trip to Europe in the 1960s, Hunk and Moo decided to educate themselves about art in order to build a collection. They sought out the best examples by the most noteworthy artists available, and had the good fortune — and foresight — to purchase stellar works by artists working in the Abstract Expressionist movement before prices became prohibitive. Their collection grew, filled their ranch house in Atherton…

Mary Margaret “Moo” Anderson, art collector and generous friend of Stanford University, dies at 92

10/24/19|Stanford News

Local resident Moo Anderson and her family gifted Stanford a celebrated collection of postwar and contemporary American art and her prized collection of art books and catalogs. BY BETH GIUDICESSI AND ROBIN WANDER Stanford donor Mary Margaret “Moo” Anderson died Oct. 22 at her Bay Area Peninsula home surrounded by her family. She was 92. In 2011, Moo, her late husband, Harry “Hunk” Anderson, and their daughter, Mary Patricia “Putter” Ande…

Hunk, Moo Anderson give modern art masterpieces to Stanford

09/09/14|SF Gate, Kenneth Baker (reprinted with permission from the San Francisco Chronicle)

Harry W. and Mary Margaret Anderson didn’t know much about art – they’d dabbled in antiques – before they first visited Paris in 1964 and made their way into the Louvre. “We became so enamored with the visual experience that on the way home, we looked at each other and said, ‘How could all this have been going on and we not have been a part of it?’ ” said Harry “Hunk” Anderson. The muse…

Harry W. “Hunk” Anderson dies at 95

02/08/18|Anderson Collection at Stanford University

Art collector and Stanford donor Harry “Hunk” Anderson dies at 95 The longtime friend of the university welcomed Stanford graduate students to study the art in his home and office, and then he and his family made the collection accessible to the world through a transformative gift. BY ROBIN WANDER Stanford neighbor, friend and philanthropist Harry W. “Hunk” Anderson died on Feb. 7 at his Bay Area Peninsula home surrounded by his family….

Stanford’s Anderson Collection museum to feature trove of couple’s art

07/11/14|Los Angeles Times

Along a shady road here, you can glimpse large estates behind gates and hedges bought with fortunes earned in Silicon Valley. Then you come to the driveway of a ranch house that stands pretty much as it was when built in the 1960s by Harry and Mary Margaret Anderson. From the unpretentious exterior, few would guess that inside the house a single painting in their collection is worth as much as one or even two of those neighboring estates. This…

The Magic of The Anderson Collection

10/08/14|Huffington Post

Pollock’s Lucifer now resides at Stanford University and is welcoming visitors. The news is of significance to everyone for reasons described in this article. Lucifer, the crown jewel of the Anderson Collection, moved to Stanford with a retinue of 120 colorful accomplices he’s befriended while living at the Andersons’ residence. The whole gang is now happily installed in a custom-designed museum on the Stanford campus. With ro…

The Anderson Collection at Stanford: An Uplifting Experience

09/24/14|Huffington Post

The Anderson Collection at Stanford: An Uplifting Experience Posted: 09/24/2014 2:51 pm EDT  Updated: 2 hours ago Visiting the newly-opened Anderson Collection at Stanford requires taking everything — your body and your expectations — up a level. After entering the building’s main lobby — which will cost you nothing as the Anderson is free — you will ascend a grand staircase that plateaus at the building&#8217…

Anderson Collection pieces lock in a home at Stanford

09/13/14|SF Gate, Sam Whiting (reprinted with permission from the San Francisco Chronicle)

Among the 121 major pieces of postwar American art he has given to Stanford, Harry W. “Hunk” Anderson has bled for just one — Frank Stella’s “Zeltweg,” a heavy, nine-piece, mixed-media painting that resembles a kids’ slot car track. So when it arrives by heavy Freightliner on a mid-August morning, Anderson and his wife, Mary Margaret (Hunk and Moo, as they are known to just about everyone who has ever met them), come by to see its installation a…

Up Close: One Painting Tours With Artists

06/05/20|A project of the Anderson Collection at Stanford University

A project of the Anderson Collection at Stanford University Hosted by art historian and the associate director of ITALIC at Stanford, Kim Beil, the micro-video series “Up Close: One Painting Tours with Artists” focuses on a single object in the Anderson Collection, sparking dialogue with a guest artist. This project is made possible by a grant from Stanford Arts and the Anderson Collection at Stanford University. Artist Rebekah Goldstein explor…

Anderson Collection opens to public on Sept. 21

09/19/14|The Stanford Daily

The Anderson Collection opens to the public at its new Stanford University home this Sunday, Sept. 21, in a freestanding pavilion next to the Cantor Arts Center in the University’s growing arts district. Members of the Cantor Arts Center and the Anderson Collection can also attend a special preview of the museum on Sept. 20. Opening day festivities will include food trucks, music, activities and digital tours. Admission is free, and while visito…