Candy Counter

Wayne Thiebaud, 1962, oil on canvas, 55 1/8 x 72 in.
Candy Counter, 1962

Wayne Thiebaud is well known for his images of food, ranging from lollipops to display cakes. During the early 1960s, he was identified with Pop Art—a connection he was quick to disclaim. Yet his own background in commercial art affect the way he handled subject matter. In Candy Counter, he heightens the intensity of the color so that orange and green candies seem to vibrate with an improbable brightness, suggesting the chromatic enhancement com

Pink and White over Red

Mark Rothko, 1957, oil on canvas, 105 x 116 in.
Pink and White over Red, 1957

His vast canvases engulf the viewer, inviting contemplation. A leading practitioner of Color Field painting, Rothko arrived at his signature format, represented here by Pink and White over Red, by the late 1940s. Rectangular fields of white and red hover weightlessly over the surface of the canvas. In contrast to many of his peers—like Jackson Pollock, who poured pre-mixed paint directly onto the canvas—Rothko achieved his luminous, shifting swa…

Ocean Park #60

Richard Diebenkorn, 1973, oil on canvas, 93 x 81 1/4 in.
Ocean Park #60, 1973

…orn moved from Berkeley to Santa Monica, where he found an art studio in Ocean Park, a gritty neighborhood along the oceanfront that was a hub of artistic activity. It was here that Diebenkorn painted the 145 paintings in his Ocean Park series, which he developed over the course of twenty years. The Ocean Park series represents a moment when Diebenkorn shifted back to abstraction after a number of years of working on representational forms. Altho…

Lucifer

Jackson Pollock, 1947, oil and enamel on canvas, 41 3/16 X 105 1/2 in.
Lucifer, 1947

In a 1951 radio interview Pollock proclaimed: “It seems to me that the modern painter cannot express this age, the airplane, the atom bomb, the radio, in the old forms of the Renaissance or any other past culture. Each age finds its own technique.” Lucifer is among the earliest examples of Pollock’s own groundbreaking approach, which involved dripping, pouring, and splattering paint directly onto a canvas that had been tacked to the floor. The p…

Hunk, Moo Anderson give modern art masterpieces to Stanford

09/09/14|SF Gate, Kenneth Baker (reprinted with permission from the San Francisco Chronicle)

…fty years and about 2,000 acquisitions later, “Hunk” and “Moo” Anderson – who made their fortune in the food service business – enjoy the sort of monosyllabic recognition in the American art scene that Sting, Cher and Prince command in pop culture. Kirk McGuire Sculpture kirkmcguire.com Amazing Bronze Sculptures & Tables LTD ­ Fine Art & Furnishings On Sept. 21, the Anderson Collection at Stanford Unive…

Barrier

Vija Celmins, 1985-1986, oil and wax on linen, 70 x 72 in.
Barrier, 1985-1986

  Up Close: One Painting Tours With Artists Barrier Hosted by art historian and the associate director of ITALIC at Stanford, Kim Beil, the micro-video series focuses on a single object in the Anderson Collection, sparking dialogue with a guest artist. Kim spoke with artist Davina Semo about Vija Celmins’ Barrier. Explore the Up Close Series   “The images are not from observations of nature, but are ’found images’ fr…

Japanese Dancer Series No. 2 [Makiko]

Manuel Neri, 1980, Charcoal, dry pigment/water on paper., 41 3/4 x 29 3/4 in.
Japanese Dancer Series No. 2 [Makiko], 1980

…ni. In Carrara Neri also met the artist Makiko Nakamura, who would inspire a rich series of work. Nakamura posed for Neri wearing traditional Japanese clothing and hairstyles. As in his works modeled after Joan Brown and Mary Julia Klimenko, Neri’s Makiko series emphasizes his interest in the anonymity of the body as form, as opposed to the individuality of portraiture, though here the body is imbued with an unmistakable Eastern exoticism. The dr…

Japanese Dancer Series No. 12 [Makiko]

Manuel Neri, 1980, Charcoal, dry pigment/water on paper., 41 3/4 x 29 3/4 in.
Japanese Dancer Series No. 12 [Makiko], 1980

…ni. In Carrara Neri also met the artist Makiko Nakamura, who would inspire a rich series of work. Nakamura posed for Neri wearing traditional Japanese clothing and hairstyles. As in his works modeled after Joan Brown and Mary Julia Klimenko, Neri’s Makiko series emphasizes his interest in the anonymity of the body as form, as opposed to the individuality of portraiture, though here the body is imbued with an unmistakable Eastern exoticism. The dr…

Makida III

Manuel Neri, 1997, Marble and oil-based enamel., 24 x 16 x 22 in.
Makida III, 1997

…ed with gestural strokes of bright pink-and-green paint used to set off her traditional Japanese hairstyle. When the figure is viewed from behind, the undulating shapes and energetic brushstrokes of her hair seem to morph into abstraction. In the late 1970s Neri began making regular trips to Carrara, Italy. He established a studio there in 1981 in order to readily access marble from the city’s famed quarries. Neri’s practice was profoundly affect…

Wall Painting No. IV

Robert Motherwell, 1954, oil on canvas, 54 x 72 in.
Wall Painting No. IV, 1954

…aries like Jackson Pollock and Mark Rothko. Wall Painting IV shows Motherwell’s investment in shape and emotion. The crescent of black paint—a recurring shape in Motherwell’s oeuvre—tears through the center of the canvas. The swaths of black become the players in Motherwell’s drama, disturbing the regular order of the alternating brown and white stripes. Motherwell, who received a BA in philosophy from Stanford in 1937, arrived in New York in 19…

Homage to the Square: Diffused

Josef Albers, 1969, oil on masonite panel, 48 x 48 in.
Homage to the Square: Diffused, 1969

…opted home, first at Black Mountain College in North Carolina and later at Yale University. In 1964 he published the influential text Interaction of Color, a handbook based on the color course he had developed over four decades of teaching. Homage to the Square: Diffused is one of hundreds of concentric-square paintings the artist made between 1949 and 1976. Each work in the series is designed to demonstrate the complex perceptual effects produce…

Red in Red

Sam Francis, 1955, oil on canvas, 78 3/8 x 78 3/8 in.
Red in Red, 1955

San Mateo-born artist Sam Francis discovered painting during his recovery from a plane crash in the U.S. Army Air Corps in 1943. Francis’ intensely colored all-over style is associated with the New York School, but Francis skipped the New York art world altogether, working briefly in Paris and primarily in California. Red in Red has a cellular, anatomical quality, like many of Francis’ paintings. The composition also resembles a landscape of yel…

Before, Again IV

Joan Mitchell, 1985, oil on canvas, 110 x 78 3/4 in.
Before, Again IV, 1985

…t Lake Michigan, or water, or field…it’s more like a poem…and that’s what I want to paint,” Mitchell said. The periods of Mitchell’s work were catalyzed by life events, relationships, and experiences. Before, Again IV comes from the late part of Mitchell’s career, after she was diagnosed with cancer. During this period, she made some of her most experimental work. Mitchell thought of painting as a form of transcendence and nurturing, and as…

Sky Garden

Louise Nevelson, 1959-1964, enamel on wood, 99 5/8 x 61 x 17 1/2 in.
Sky Garden, 1959-1964

…lose examination of the sculpture reveals wooden table legs, banisters, and jagged planks. Nevelson began making these wooden constructions in the 1950s after relocating to New York City and taking classes at the Art Students League. These large-scale sculptures sometimes approach a monumental scale, like Sky Garden, or grow into environments, taking over full rooms. Nevelson spent much of her career in New York City, but she shares a sense of is…

Standing Figure II

Manuel Neri, 1982, pigment on plaster, 69 1/4 x 17 7/8 x 19 1/2 in.
Standing Figure II, 1982

This life-size plaster figure was modeled after Neri’s long-time muse and model, the poet Mary Julia Klimenko, who became his principal model in 1972. It is not a portrait but a figure—one of hundreds Neri has made in plaster over the course of his seven-decade-long career. Plaster is the medium for which he is best known. Affordable and readily available, it can be worked quickly and easily—molded when wet and carved when dry. Every inch of the…

Window

Mark Tobey, 1953, casein on board on masonite, 44 3/8 x 28 1/2 in.
Window, 1953

…ey became fascinated by haiku, Japanese and Chinese calligraphy, and mysticism, and he subsequently converted to the Baha’i World Faith. He believed that there could be no break between nature, art, science, religion, and one’s personal life. The unity in his personal worldview manifests itself in Tobey’s signature painting style, which he called “white writing”: densely packed calligraphic symbols overlaying an abstracted field. Resembling lacey…

Stanford’s Anderson Collection museum to feature trove of couple’s art

07/11/14|Los Angeles Times

…tractions by Ellsworth Kelly, Richard Diebenkorn, Agnes Martin and Robert Motherwell. Stanford is really making the arts equal to the sciences, math, humanities and so forth. To be a part of that is really a great thing. – Harry ‘Hunk’ Anderson It goes on and on, through the library, kitchen and three bedrooms. This September, however, 121 works by 86 artists, half from the house and half from Quadrus, a Cliff May-designed com

A new lust for art takes hold in Silicon Valley

05/15/17|SF Chronicle

…ng thing comes on the market, (art collectors in the area) can’t always get on a plane and go to New York to see them. So now that really amazing thing will come to them.” And there is certainly evidence of an increasing appetite for contemporary and modern art in the suburbs. Art Silicon Valley/San Francisco, which highlights postwar and modern works, is returning to San Mateo in October for its fifth annual edition; over the course of its three…

The Museum of Hunk, Moo & Putter: The Anderson Collection at Stanford will Rock You

12/28/18|Forbes Magazine

…s ability to provide a meaningful encounter with the art it presents. Which is why The Anderson as successful it is in the experience it provides is worth a visit. In the Anderson Collection at Stanford University, one still has the opportunity to commune with Hunk, Moo and Putter’s treasures and see, taste and feel how Art rocks your brain. I am an award-winning journalist and producer who has created print, video and online media content for…

A Private Passion Goes Public: Stanford’s Anderson Collection

10/22/14|Art in America

…mid-century giants like Jackson Pollock and Willem de Kooning to contemporary artists including Martin Puryear. The collection is a gift from Harry “Hunk” Anderson, a co-founder of the Saga food-service company, his wife Mary Margaret “Moo” Anderson and their daughter Mary Patricia “Putter” Anderson Pence. The new 33,000-square-foot, $36-million building, designed by Richard Olcott, contains works by 86 artist…